CULTURE: DIY Walking Tours - Art & Historic Landmarks Below Canal Street (12.20.17)

CULTURE: DIY Walking Tours - Art & Historic Landmarks Below Canal Street (12.20.17)

This is the time of year where you, your family and your friends often have more free time and/or company, and are desperate for ideas on what to do. Especially on those days where the weather is “unseasonably warm” (we call it “not freezing"), it’s good to have a go-to list of outdoor activities to check out.

Here are some of our favorite free outdoor monuments, artistic sculptures and historic spots to check out (many of which you probably pass every day) so you can create your own DIY walking tour...

-Joie de Vivre (Zuccotti Park) - This 70 foot-tall Mark di Suervo sculpture was moved from the Holland Tunnel rotary to the park in 2006. It’s bright red color stands out and brings happiness to locals passing by.

-Red Cube (140 Broadway) – Across from Zuccotti Park is another bright red sculpture. Isamu Noguchi's Red Cube is not actually a cube, but has been stretched along its vertical axis

-Titanic Memorial Lighthouse (South Street Seaport) – Built in 1913 and moved to its current spot in 1968, the sculpture is designed to honor those who lost their lives on the historic ship.

-Charging Bull (Broadway & Morris) – You know exactly what we are talking about. We recommend checking this out on off hours (aka nighttime). It was created by Arturo Di Modica as a way to celebrate the can-do spirit of America and New York, “a symbol of virility and courage that Arturo saw as the perfect antidote to the Wall Street crash of 1986.”

-Group of Four Trees (Chase Plaza) - Jean Dubuffet’s sculpture was done at the request of David Rockefeller in 1969.

-Fearless Girl (North of Charging Bull) – This somewhat new addition to the downtown landscape is a bronze sculpture by Kristen Visbal, commissioned by State Street Global Advisors via McCann New York, depicting a girl facing the Charging Bull. Its plaque reads, "Know the power of women in leadership. SHE makes a difference.”

-Stone Street – Yes, it’s also a go-to spot for plenty of bars and restaurants, but the street, originally called Brewers Street, is the original street from 1660 (and the 1st paved street in NYC). The Stone Street name came from the cobblestones used to pave it.

-Trinity Churchyard - The cemetery’s graves date back to the 17th century, including the city's oldest carved tombstone and an ominous cryptogram. Oh, and Alexander Hamilton’s grave.

-Jeff Koons Balloon Flower -  The red balloon flower sits north of World Trade Center complex, standing as bright and optimistic tribute to the memories of those lost in the 9/11 tragedy.

-St. George's Syrian Catholic Church - This vacant church in the Financial District was once the heart of New York's first Syrian immigrant community. It is one of the few structures remaining from the Syrian and Lebanese colony that existed in lower Manhattan until the 1940s.

-Wall Street bombing marks- On September 16, 1920, a horse-drawn carriage carrying a large bomb was driven to the intersection of Wall and Broad Street. You can still see the craters on the wall of 23 Wall Street.

-The oldest fence in NYC – Forget Charging Bull. Directly south of it is a great landmark: The oldest fence in New York City, built in the 1700s this downtown iron barrier once protected a despised king, George III.

-American Merchant Mariner's Memorial (The Battery) – The United States Merchant Mariner suffered more casualties than any other American service during World War II. Designed to be a memorial, twice a day one bronze mariner drowns with the tide to remember all those the sea has taken.

-African Burial Ground National Monument - This memorial space highlights an often-overlooked piece of NYC history: its relatively large population of Africans in the pre-Revolutionary War era.

 

Interested in more ideas to create your own walking tour of art? Check out LMCC’s Creative Insider’s Guide To Lower Manhattan. Let us know what your favorites are!

 

 

 

This is the time of year where you, your family and your friends often have more free time and/or company, and are desperate for ideas on what to do. Especially on those days where the weather is “unseasonably warm” (we call it “not freezing), it’s good to have a go-to list of outdoor activities to check out. Here’s some of our favorite free outdoor monuments, sculptures and historic spots to check out (many of which you probably pass every day)….

-Joie de Vivre (Zuccotti Park) This 70 foot-tall Mark di Suervo sculpture was moved from the Holland Tunnel rotary to the park in 2006. It’s bright red color stands out and brings happiness to locals passing by.

-Red Cube (140 Broadway) – Across from Zuccotti Park is another bright red sculpture. Isamu Noguchi's Red Cube is not actually a cube, but has been stretched along its vertical axis

-Titanic Memorial Lighthouse (South Street Seaport) – Built in 1913 and moved to its current spot in 1968, the sculpture is designed to honor those who lost their lives on the historic ship.

-Charging Bull (Broadway & Morris) – You know exactly what we are talking about. We recommend checking this out on off hours (aka nighttime). It was created by Arturo Di Modica as a way to celebrate the can-do spirit of America and New York, “a symbol of virility and courage that Arturo saw as the perfect antidote to the Wall Street crash of 1986.”

-Group of Four Trees (Chase Plaza) - Jean Dubuffet’s sculpture was done at the request of David Rockefeller in 1969.

-Fearless Girl (North of Charging Bull) – This somewhat new addition to the downtown landscape is a bronze sculpture by Kristen Visbal, commissioned by State Street Global Advisors via McCann New York, depicting a girl facing the Charging Bull. Its plaque reads, "Know the power of women in leadership. SHE makes a difference.”

-Stone Street – Yes, it’s also a go-to spot for plenty of bars and restaurants, but the street, originally called Brewers Street, is the original street from 1660 (and the 1st paved street in NYC). The Stone Street name came from the cobblestones used to pave it.

-Trinity Churchyard - The cemetery’s graves date back to the 17th century, including the city's oldest carved tombstone and an ominous cryptogram. Oh, and Alexander Hamilton’s grave.

-Jeff Koons Balloon Flower -  The red balloon flower sits north of World Trade Center complex, standing as bright and optimistic tribute to the memories of those lost in the 9/11 tragedy.

-St. George's Syrian Catholic Church - This vacant church in the Financial District was once the heart of New York's first Syrian immigrant community. It is one of the few structures remaining from the Syrian and Lebanese colony that existed in lower Manhattan until the 1940s.

-Wall Street bombing marks- On September 16, 1920, a horse-drawn carriage carrying a large bomb was driven to the intersection of Wall and Broad Street. You can still see the craters on the wall of 23 Wall Street.

-The oldest fence in NYC – Forget Charging Bull. Directly south of it is a great landmark: The oldest fence in New York City, built in the 1700s this downtown iron barrier once protected a despised king, George III.

-American Merchant Mariner's Memorial (The Battery) – The United States Merchant Mariner suffered more casualties than any other American service during World War II. Designed to be a memorial, twice a day one bronze mariner drowns with the tide to remember all those the sea has taken.

-African Burial Ground National Monument - This memorial space highlights an often-overlooked piece of NYC history: its relatively large population of Africans in the pre-Revolutionary War era.

 

Interested in more ideas to create your own walking tour of art? Check out LMCC’s Creative Insider’s Guide To Lower Manhattan. Let us know what your favorites are!

 

 

WEEK AHEAD: Everything Going On Below Canal Street (12.21.17)

WEEK AHEAD: Everything Going On Below Canal Street (12.21.17)

CULTURE: Sea Of Light (12.18.17)

CULTURE: Sea Of Light (12.18.17)